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Monday, July 21, 2008

Review: STEP BROTHERS



Lets begin with these delightful posters. They are all over the malls and such, and when they come on, you think that it is a picture, until they begin to move at least. I think this is a very creative form of advertising, and could be used to even more potential in the future. Whoever thought of those posters is genius.

Now... on to the movie.

(Spoilers May Occur in This Paragraph)
Step Brothers is a hilarious comedy about a two 40 year old live at home losers, Dale (John C. Riley [ Chicago, Walk hard: The Dewey Cox Story]) and Brennan (Will Ferrell [ Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy], The Producers]), who are made stepbrothers once their parents marry on a whim. They meet each other for the first time after the wedding, and in instantly turns into a battle for who can hate each other more. Eventually they must reconcile (as all movies have) in order to save the day before it is too late.... as well as find jobs... and maybe find some women too.

Its not too easy for them to coast through life when they are constantly being surprised by Brennan's younger and much more successful brother, Derek (Adam Scott [Knocked Up]), who is so driven to succeed, you will think you are watching Greg Kinnear in 'Little Mrs. Sunshine'... if Kinnear took some speed and steroids first.

Produced by Judd Apatow, Directed by Adam Mckay, and Written by Adam Mckay, Will Ferrell, and John C. Riley, Step Brothers certainly succeeds, and all its jokes hit right on the mark. I think this is one of their funniest comedies to date. Each performance is memorable, and leaves you wanting more.

As the two parents, Mary Steenburgen and Richard Jenkins are a good match. Mary tries to have a say but is easily put down by Richard, making seemingly realistic family dynamics. The only thing I could never get is how Brennan and Dale never met before they got married. Kind of large plot hole. The relationship is unstable, story-wise, and could have used a mere 3 minute extra scene to sort it all out. Maybe it is explained on the DVD.

Adam Scott ( Knocked Up) and Kathryn Hahn (Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy) make the perfect ultimately dysfunctional couple. They are so dysfunctional, in fact, I would never be able to figure out how they got together in the first place. I want to tell you more about the characters, but I think that it would spoil some of the fun. Trust me though, they have fantastic comedic timing, and every scene they are in is worth the watch.

Seth Rogen ( Knocked Up, Pineapple Express) and Ken Jeong (Knocked Up, Pineapple Express) both appear in the film, in some slightly random "blink and you will miss them" roles. It is nice to see them on screen, but it is a shame that they did not get to put their comedy skills to use, especially with how funny the two of them are. Perhaps there will be some nice deleted scenes with them, being trademark funny. That would be cool.

While everyone knows and loves Will Ferrell - John C. Riley may be one of the greatest big time comedy players who gets the least recognition. I urge everyone to see his performances in Walk Hard, and Talladega Nights, (and his other films), because each is more priceless than the next, including this one as one of the tops. Will Ferrell is his trademark character... and after seeing him play such a similar character in so many films, one begins to wonder... is he even acting... or is this just how he really is? I don't mean that in a bad way though, because if he really is like his characters, he must be the most fun person to hang out with... ever.

STEP BROTHERS hits theaters next Friday!




Ps.
Freaks and Geeks fans will like the use of the shows font in the opening titles. Its a nice touch.
2 stars

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